THE FINAL CHALLENGE SUBMISSION PERIOD ENDED DECEMBER 30, 2012!

Completed all sixteen coding lessons and ready to show us your stuff? The Submission Period is now open and we’d like to see if you really are Coding for GOOD. To ensure you have an opportunity to show us the lessons and skills you’ve mastered, below we have created three options for you to choose from. Take your time — we want to see not just what you’ve learned, but how you can show us your personality and creativity through the project as well. And, instead of having two weeks to submit your project, we have extended the deadline to December 30th! Lessons will also be available during this time, so if you haven’t finished yet, keep on trucking. With weekly online office hours, Thursdays 12-4pm PST at https://goodis.campfirenow.com/fac53, and our email codingforgood@goodinc.com, we’re always here to help.

Are you eligible to submit the final Coding for GOOD challenge? Read these guidelines and find out!

check out the rules

Coding for GOOD Challenges

Option 1: BUILD AN INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCE

Use HTML, CSS, JavaScript — and optionally <CANVAS> — to create and add interactivity to a web page. The result can be fun or informative – or both! Whether a simple word game to a fancy photo gallery, the notion that the page responds to user input is the key!

Examples

  • Hangman game
  • Middle Class Tax Calculator
  • Choose-Your-Own Adventure Story
  • Whack-a-mole game

Option 2: CREATE A UTILITY USING API INTEGRATION

Use at least one of the APIs covered in Unit 4 to create a fun or useful utility. Use your imagination in addition to what you learned throughout the Coding for GOOD lessons, and make something cool to show us what you’ve learned!

Examples:

  • Find instagram photos taken at a particular location by selecting the location from a map
  • Select a city from GoogleMaps and use SoundCloud to play a track from a popular band from close to the selected location

Option 3: DEVELOP AN INFORMATIVE WEBSITE FROM SCRATCH

Use HTML and CSS to structure a 3 to 5 page site about a cause or issue that is important to you. Use CSS to implement a layout and design that you feel fits the nature of the site. The site should use both text and images, and HTML should be semantically correct. JavaScript is not required, but encouraged.

Examples:

  • Design a sample web site for an imaginary organization. Be sure to include the type of information that visitors to this site would be looking for.
  • Design a sample web site to explain something important to you, or to tell a story.